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RESTON®POT – Pot Bearings

mageba Pot Bearings are durable bearings that can be used in many situations, whether in big or small bridges, or a variety of engineering structures.

Principle

A natural rubber pad is placed in a steel pot, and a steel plate (piston) is placed on top. Under high pressure the pad loses its stiffness: its elasticity enables tilting movements of the piston about any horizontal axis.

Depending on whether it is a fixed, guided sliding or free sliding bearing, it can accommodate horizontal forces and movements (longitudinal or transverse) as well as vertical loads.

Quality

mageba pot bearings have been used successfully more than 50,000 times over a period of over four decades throughout the world.

Quality and durability of bearings are ensured by:

  • Qualified and experienced personnel
  • Cleverly designed and reliable components (e.g. POM-sealing)
  • High-quality materials (PTFE-disc with a minimum thickness of 5 mm, DU-strips with bronze pieces, well controlled silicone oil, etc.)
  • High quality standard (certified to ISO9001:2000 & EN729-2)
  • External supervision by a recognised building supervision institute (MPA Stuttgart, Germany)
  • Licences and QA certified working and manufacturing practice
RESTON®POT bearings are manufactured in accordance with European Standard EN1337-5. They are marked with the CE label, which confirms that they fulfil every requirement of this standard.

The quality and conformity is regularly inspected by the independent inspection institute MPA Stuttgart in Germany.

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References

Belgrade, Serbia (2012)

Nijmegen, Gelderland, Netherlands (1973)

Nicosia, Cyprus

Rougemont, Vaud, Switzerland (1905)

Patna, Bihar, India (2017)

Brig-Glis, Valais, Switzerland (1980)

  • About this
    data sheet
  • Product-ID
    13
  • Date created
    02/07/2007
  • Last Update
    16/02/2017